Creative community to reunite for Savannah Local Artist Market

SLAM shines spotlight on more than 60 local artists

click to enlarge Local artists greet visitors at the Savannah Local Artist Market. - PHOTOS COURTESY OF SLAM
Photos courtesy of SLAM
Local artists greet visitors at the Savannah Local Artist Market.
The Savannah Local Artist Market – aka SLAM – will return on March 6 for a third year to spotlight works by over 60 area visionaries, encompassing everything from paintings, prints, and jewelry to sculptures, woodwork, textiles, and ceramics.

SLAM Founder Charles Ellis says that along with the artworks, live music, and food trucks, the market will display “a broad range of highly talented people.” Blues guitarist Peter Schmid and Savannah’s Crabettes will be performing, while food vendors include Molly’s Fish & Chips and Jenni’s Ice Cream.

In 2019, Ellis consulted with community art leaders who agreed that Savannah needed more art markets, and thus SLAM was born. This year over 20 new artists are slated to present, but in light of the pandemic, coronavirus safety precautions will be in place with social distancing, required use of face masks, and plenty of hand sanitizer.

Unlike many art markets, SLAM supports its participants by not charging a sales commission.

Stella Ranae Von Schmid displays her leaf-imprinted textile art at the Savannah Local Artist Market. - PHOTO COURTESY OF SLAM
Photo courtesy of SLAM
Stella Ranae Von Schmid displays her leaf-imprinted textile art at the Savannah Local Artist Market.
“I’m a Slammete,” painter Peggy Aughtry proudly shared. “When I started in 2019, it was my very first show and the experience was amazing. There were so many people that came ... and Charlie was so helpful and encouraging.”

A fan of oil pastels and abstract art, Aughtry developed “Setting Boundaries,” a therapeutic and emotional portrait series.

“There’s people I only see once a year at SLAM, so it’s really nice to be all together in the art community,” Aughtry said. For anyone looking to fill their home with whimsical conversation pieces, Shawn Turner’s work is a must-see. His creations are all hand-sewn and made with leftover fabric from high-end design studios.

“I really want to see how far I can push blending and collaging fabric,” Turner said. His collection incorporates detailed horses, mice, bunnies, pigs, and – his personal favorite – birds. Aiming to produce zero waste, Turner even utilizes scraps and threads for bird nests. The intricacy of his work can be fully appreciated at SLAM.

“When you get to see things in person, it’s a whole different textile sensation,” Turner explained.

“This past year has been more isolating than normal. So, it’s actually a joy to see someone walk away with [my work]. I miss that connection,” - Stella Ranae Von Schmid, a botanical and fiber artist.

tweet this
Savannah native Jim Cone enjoys working with oils, acrylics, wood, glass, and just about anything else that catches his eye.

“I clean up the environment and repurpose it into art,” Cone said. A Picasso aficionado, he described his process as “an orchestra of movement that evolves into a concert of art.” His popular series “Street People” focuses attention on the homeless, presenting them as individuals.

Stella Ranae Von Schmid, a botanical and fiber artist, believes that making a connection with customers in person adds more meaning to the art.

“This past year has been more isolating than normal. So, it’s actually a joy to see someone walk away with [my work]. I miss that connection,” Von Schmid said. Known for mesmerizing silk scarves, kimonos, and bandanas imprinted with leaves and flowers, eco-dyeing felt like a natural progression in her pursuit toward a sustainable lifestyle. “This is the ultimate Savannah souvenir. You are taking a piece of Savannah with you.”

Darlene Cook, artist, displays art at ther booth with Charles Ellis, SLAM founder. - PHOTO COURTESY OF SLAM
Photo courtesy of SLAM
Darlene Cook, artist, displays art at ther booth with Charles Ellis, SLAM founder.
Even shoppers can get involved by participating in the Community Canvas.

“We are going to have a large sheet of plywood up, and everybody can go over and paint their own masterpiece on it,” Ellis said. “The ultimate goal is for everybody to have a good time.” cs

The Savannah Local Artist Market will be happening at The Salvation Army Community Center (3000 Bee Rd., Savannah) during 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. on March 6. Visit facebook.com/savannahlocalartistmarket to find more event information.

Comments (0)

Add a comment

Add a Comment
  • Downtown Delilahs Modern Burlesque Cabaret

    @ House of Mata Hari

    Thu., Oct. 21, 11-11:59 p.m., Fri., Oct. 22, 9:30-10:30 & 11-11:59 p.m., Sat., Oct. 23, 9:30-10:30 & 11-11:59 p.m., Thu., Oct. 28, 11-11:59 p.m. and Fri., Oct. 29, 9:30-10:30 & 11-11:59 p.m.

  • or

Right Now On

Now Playing

By Film...

By Theater...