Favorite

Reviews: Julie & Julia, Perfect Getaway 

 

JULIE & JULIA

***1/2

No question about it: Nora Ephron gets a bum rap from both critics and moviegoers, who often disparage her as if she were Hollywood's female equivalent of Michael Bay (and Bay at least has the sizable fanboy demographic in his corner). Certainly, she deserves a lot of heat for foisting such turkeys as Mixed Nuts, Lucky Numbers and that lamentable big-screen Bewitched on our unprotected heads, but geez, let's not forget that she's also the writer of such accomplished pictures as Silkwood and When Harry Met Sally... Of course, it can be argued that all of her best work is well over a decade old, and what has she done for us lately?

Julie & Julia, that's what she's done. Working overtime as writer, director and producer, Ephron has taken a pair of books -- My Life in France, by Julia Child with Alex Prud'homme, and Julie & Julia, by Julie Powell -- and combined them into one irresistible motion picture. It's a film that rises two stories, on one hand focusing on the legendary Julia Child (Meryl Streep) as she begins her journey toward becoming one of America's greatest chefs, and on the other following Julie Powell (Amy Adams) as her idea for a blog -- cook all 524 recipes in Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking in 365 days -- eventually leads to fame and fortune.

The Julia Child segments of the film are magnificent. As the towering, exuberant Child, Streep delivers another astonishing performance, never lapsing into mere caricature but steadfastly making sure to capture all facets of the woman's personality. Child is a wizard in the kitchen, but she's also revealed to be a best friend to the world around her, sweeping up everyone in her whirlwind of oversized emotions (which tend to be on the cheerful side 90 percent of the time). The movie is so reverential toward Child -- and Child herself is easily able to laugh at her own flaws -- that when a clip of Dan Aykroyd parodying Child on Saturday Night Live is shown being watched by Julie and her husband (Chris Messina), it actually takes on the stance of a homage rather than a spoof.

The best parts of the Child sequences focus on the marriage between Julia and her husband Paul (Stanley Tucci, reuniting with Streep on the high heels of The Devil Wears Prada). A mild-mannered diplomat, Paul encourages and supports Julia's culinary aspirations and is always happy to remain out of the spotlight even as his wife's fame takes hold. Movies aren't normally where we turn to watch happily married couples in action, but the Julia-Paul relationship is one of the most blissful seen in years, and Streep and Tucci dance through their interpretations with the grace and ease of an Astaire-Rogers routine.

When compared to the Julia Child portions, the Julie Powell chapters aren't nearly as compelling, but they're far from the drag that others have suggested. Admittedly, the more I read about Powell, the less I like her (she seems like little more than a publicity hound with some highly dubious notions on how to advance her career), but at the time when I had screened the movie, I knew next to nothing about her, and it seems unfair to penalize the portrayal after the fact. So within the context of the picture, Julie's tale is charming, and it's aided immeasurably by Adams' typically likable performance in the role.

Two-time Oscar nominee Stephen Goldblatt (Batman Forever) was brought on board to shoot the picture, and while most of the film looks good, it can be assumed that the photography of the food probably took precedence even over the actors. As in Babette's Feast, Eat Drink Man Woman and Big Night (another foodie flick with Tucci), the camera gazes so lovingly on each prepared dish (even the burnt ones!) that it's virtually impossible to exit the theater without wanting to head immediately to a gourmet restaurant. That, then, is one of the beauties of Julie & Julia: While other ambitious movies are content targeting the heart and the mind, this one adds another palatable layer by also going for the stomach.

A PERFECT GETAWAY

***

A Perfect Getaway might be far from perfect, but it's good enough to be considered one of this summer's biggest out-of-left-field surprises. A twisty thriller that will keep most audience members alternately on their toes and on the edge of their seats, this feels like a classic case of a B movie showing its more heavily hyped A-list competition how to get the job done with little fuss or fanfare. A Perfect Getaway is set in Hawaii, but forget Sarah Marshall: Despite some humor spicing up the picture at regular intervals, this mostly shows how Paradise on Earth can quickly morph into a living hell, as news spreads around the islands about how a newlywed couple was gruesomely murdered by another couple who got away. Cliff (Steve Zahn) and Cydney (Milla Jovovich), newlyweds themselves, are determined not to let this disturbing information disrupt their honeymoon, which consists of hoofing it through remote Hawaiian terrain. Largely to steer clear of a menacing couple (Chris Hemsworth and Marley Shelton) giving off that Natural Born Killers vibe, they hook up with another pair (Timothy Olyphant and Kiele Sanchez) whose own peculiarities (outlandish Iraq War tales, a glee in skinning and gutting wild animals) quickly unnerve them. Is it possible that Cliff and Cydney's new friends are the actual killers?
A key scene about two-thirds through the movie is overplayed and in effect makes it easier to guess the major plot pirouette. Yet even those who pick up on the forthcoming twist should enjoy this picture for its other merits, including the shifting dynamics between the characters, some memorable fight sequences, and the manner in which writer-director David Twohy (whose finer moments include co-scripting The Fugitive and serving as writer-director on Pitch Black) plays with audience expectations. A Perfect Getaway will strike some as being too clever for its own good, but others (like me) will view it as an escape from the late-summer doldrums.

 

 

 

Favorite

More by Matt Brunson

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Connect Today 12.15.2017

Latest in Film Reviews

  • Review: Coco
  • Review: Coco

    Coco opens by following the traditional toon template of a person following their dreams against all odds, but once Miguel reaches the Land of the Dead, the movie deepens in satisfying and even unexpected ways.
    • Dec 6, 2017
  • Review: Last Flag Flying
  • Review: Last Flag Flying

    Last Flag Flying is proudly pro-soldier and anti-war, and real American patriots will grasp it at once.
    • Nov 21, 2017
  • Review: Justice League
  • Review: Justice League

    Gal Gadot again ends up as a saving grace, and she also figures at the center of one of the few action sequences (a bank robbery) that’s exciting rather than cumbersome.
    • Nov 14, 2017
  • More »

The Most: Read | Shared | Comments

Movies This Week

More Filmtimes

or

Right Now On: Twitter | Facebook

Copyright © 2017, Connect Savannah. All Rights Reserved.
Website powered by Foundation