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Editor's Note: Shut up and enjoy the show 

THE WORLD is on fire and World War III is warming up in the bullpen.

But let me indulge in a bit of a First World Problems rant if you don’t mind.

I like to have a good time. I am by no means a stick in the mud when it comes to live performances. Far from it.

Hell, I think classical music should go back to encouraging people to clap between movements, as originally intended.

But can we talk?

Don’t talk.

No, seriously, when you’re at a show can you please just not talk to all your friends?

Especially not talk to your friends AS LOUD AS YOU CAN so that you can be heard over the professional musician or performer you and others presumably paid good money to see?

It’s great that you’re apparently made of money and can afford to throw it away on a show you’re clearly not interested in.

Good for you.

But others aren’t so lucky, and they’d like to, you know, hear the music they paid to enjoy, instead of hearing you and your friends talk loudly about nothing.

I’ve asked around about this. And most everybody I know says the same thing:

Savannah audiences take the cake for being rude as hell and talking over shows.

We all seem to have a story, or many stories, about a group of drunken narcissists who spoil the show for everyone else.

In some cases, as with the now-infamous Dave Chappelle performance here years ago, the performer actually leaves the stage in frustration and disgust.

Most of the time, though, the performers stick it out. Because they’re gonna get paid anyway.

Which isn’t the case for those of us who pay to enjoy a show, but end up mostly hearing about how drunk Buffy got the other night, or how that guy doesn’t even lift, bro.

We won’t get that money back, nor more importantly can we enjoy the show.

Just go to a bar already! That’s what they’re for. We’ve got a million great ones here, trust me. They’d love your business.

Some of this problem is due to the fact that, as many others have noted, Savannah is a see-and-be-seen town where we all pretty much know each other.

Ninety percent of the time that’s a great thing. I’m not complaining.

The other ten percent of the time, however, it means the social pecking and preening order takes precedence over whatever’s or whoever’s onstage.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking it’s just natives or near-natives who are guilty of this. This is a syndrome that seems to possess people of all backgrounds and ages.

The common trait is entitlement. And entitlement is an ugly thing.

Don’t be ugly. Be cool.

And don’t talk. Enjoy!

cs
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About The Author

Jim Morekis

Jim Morekis

Bio:
A native Savannahian, Jim has been editor-in-chief of Connect Savannah for ten years. The University of Georgia graduate is also a travel writer, authoring regional guides in the Moon handbook series... more

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