Editor's Note

Editor's Note: Tony Thomas and his many enablers

If you’re mad about Thomas doing the same thing tens of thousands of others did on St. Patrick’s Day, except while representing taxpayers, I’m right there with you. But spare me the moralistic hypocrisy.

Music Features

Get Down at A-Town: A talk with Cracker's Johnny Hickman

Music and arts celebration moves under the bridge

Music Features

Savannah Music Festival: The Avett Brothers ‘reframing’ their sound

Sibling storytellers expand the sonic nature of their musical journey

Music Features

Savannah Music Festival: For BalletCollective, it all starts with a conversation

Southern premiere of collaborative performance brings architecture to life onstage

Community

Getting intersectional with Crunk Feminist Collective

Popular social justice organization breaks it down at Armstrong on March 30

Interview

Savannah Music Festival: For Joel Savoy, ‘Whatever I do is Cajun enough for me’

Legendary fiddle player brings Louisiana sound to town

Interview

Savannah Music Festival: Our ‘gleaming musical treasure’

SMF Executive Director Rob Gibson talks about this year’s premiere-studded event

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NEWS & OPINION

The urban planning vision behind A-Town Get Down

The urban planning vision behind A-Town Get Down

What was once a forlorn patch of weeds under the Talmadge Bridge will be transformed into a public park bustling with bands, food trucks and visual art, a testament to the possibilities and potential of climbing outside the proverbial boring box.

  • Editor's Note: Tony Thomas and his many enablers

    If you’re mad about Thomas doing the same thing tens of thousands of others did on St. Patrick’s Day, except while representing taxpayers, I’m right there with you. But spare me the moralistic hypocrisy.

  • Getting intersectional with Crunk Feminist Collective

    Popular social justice organization breaks it down at Armstrong on March 30

  • Editor's Note: Tourists in our own hometown?

    Downtown is now ringed with hotels, many of which have been allowed to rise higher than traditional building designs we’re used to in the historic district. Like tree branches competing for sunlight, this “race to the top” means the Savannah skyline is increasingly like a walled city. Or, as some critics observe, a gated community for tourists.

  • Erin go bald?

    St. Baldrick's, the mass shaving event in City Market, raises money to treat childhood cancer

  • Keeping a green eye on the coast

    Georgia’s shores threatened by development, coal ash pollution and more

MUSIC & CLUBS

Savannah Music Festival Review: DakhaBrakha's 'Earth'

Savannah Music Festival Review: DakhaBrakha's 'Earth'

It’s easy to see why the Ukrainian quartet were inspired to conceptualize music for this hypnotically compelling film in their return to the Savannah Music Festival.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

A good parade isn't so hard to find

A good parade isn't so hard to find

Celebrate Flannery O'Connor's birthday with fanfare, local authors, costumes and cake

FOOD & DRINK

Below Zero Dessert Bar + Café on Barnard  builds on success of Broughton location

Below Zero Dessert Bar + Café on Barnard builds on success of Broughton location

The Tsoi and Cutlip family plan to build a brand and introduce Savannah to new food trends

FILM

Review: Wilson

Review: Wilson

Sentiment quickly takes the place of cynicism, and, despite the occasional flash of brutal wit, the film settles into a well-worn groove of indie preciousness.

  • Review: Beauty and the Beast

    The plot remains fundamentally unchanged from the ’91 model, and the narrative diversions that have been added along the way are acceptable and sometimes even manage to enhance particular points from its predecessor.

  • Review: Logan

    The film is crucially missing a worthy villain of note – and when the scripters run out of ideas, they paraphrase Stephen Sondheim and elect to send in the clones. This latter decision renders the action sequences even more rote and less interesting.

  • Review: A United Kingdom

    As is often the case with historical sagas, the picture relegates lots of fascinating material into a few blocks of text at the end, giving short shrift to the subsequent accomplishments of two people who refused to be defined merely by their physical appearances.

  • Review: John Wick Chapter 2

    Keanu Reeves is again suitably taciturn as the former assassin who, just when he thought he was out, gets pulled back in, and the criminal world created for the first picture — a landscape in which there exists neutral-zone hotels in which no blood may be spilled – retains its unique appeal.

  • Review: Fifty Shades Darker

    The major liabilities of the first picture have been neatly carried over into this latest endeavor, beginning with the fact that the general prudishness permeating throughout American society makes it impossible for Hollywood to produce an honest, provocative or explicit film about S-E-X and have it receive an R rating.

Connect Today 03.26.2017

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